The Physical Lincoln: A54j

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Version 1: Digital Print of Hardcopy thumb
Print Key: alteration of: Library of Congress LC-USZ62-10673-3a13087u
Print URL: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2008678330/
MaxPixels: 4012 x 5000
Comments:
Observations: Thumbnail Image has been widened to compensate for artifactual vertical elongation of original; explanation. Thumbnail shows reality sidedness; see note below. Finding:=Cheek mole: Cheek mole:=seen. Finding:=Ear lobe line: Ear lobe line:=unseen. Finding:=Ptosis: Ptosis:=bilateral. Eyelid higher on left. Bilateral single vertical cheek furrows. Jaw symmetry. Skinny neck. Hair part not clear.
Version 2: Digital Print of Hardcopy thumb
Print Key: Library of Congress LC-USZ62-10673-3a13087u
Print URL: unavailable offsite.
MaxPixels: 959 x 1536
Comments:
Observations: Image has an artifactual vertical elongation; explanation. Thumbnail shows reality sidedness; see note below.
Print: Mellon p21
Caption: (p20) Gelatin silver print of a lost contemporary print of the lost presumed daguerreotype made in Chicago by Johan Carl Frederic Polycarpus Von Schneidau, in 1854.
Collection: George Rinhart
Observations:



<= a46   a57 =>
A54j
Photographer Schneidau
Location Chicago
Sitting sitdate:=1854-10
Technique Daguerreotype
Meserve # Meserve Number:=3
Ostendorf # Ostendorf Number:=6
Ostendorf pg Ostendorf Page:=18
Mellon pg Mellon Page:=21
Kunhardt pg Kunhardt Page:=104
Synonym none
AL ML RL TL WL XL
<= a46 a57 =>
 
 mellon  (p191)
Provides excellent discussion of the reason this image, once thought to have been taken in 1858, is now dated October 1854.
 hamilton 
Daguerreotype by P. von Schneidau, Chicago, Sunday, July 11, 1858.
 ostendorfA 
Daguerreotype by P. von Schneidau, Chicago, Friday, October 27, 1854.
 kunhardt  (p104)
"The second earliest known photograph of Lincoln was taken in 1854 in Chicago."

Mirror comment

The original image is billed as a daguerreotype. This means that Lincoln should be shown mirror-reversed. However, the mole on Lincoln's face is visible on his right side (as it was in reality), which means that these prints from the original image have already been mirror-reversed somewhere along the way. Thus, the images presented here are as the Library of Congress presents them.
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